Archive for the ‘New Titles’ Category

Well – it’s been a while, hasn’t it.  Things have been very quiet round here lately – you might almost say I took a year off.  Partly I had my own writing project to work on (my novel Meat) and partly, lets be honest, I was just exhausted.  It takes it out of you, running a small press – trying to sell books, keep writers happy (herding cats anyone?) and keep up with the admin and paperwork.  But I am pleased to say that things are moving again here – and it is with a certain ship-launching, bottle-of-campaign excitement that I can reveal the first cover of 2014 – Alexander Zelenyj’s Songs for the Lost.  Zelenyj is an absolute master of emotional horror, melancholy, passion and the delicate art of drawing on classic pop-culture and genre forms to create something highly complex, challenging and really quite visionary.  This is a spectacular big book and a fitting way to ‘break my fast’ as it were.

Songs 10 Final

We will be running our usual online ordering fun and games for the first 26 copies – keep your eyes open for that.  I will also be rushing these through and hope to have some of them available at FantasyCon 2014.

Most exciting of all, there will also be a small second book by the same author released alongside and forming a companion piece.  Ballads To The Burning Twins will essentially be a poetry collection – or more accurately a set of imaginary ‘lyrics’ that is intimately connected to the main Songs For The Lost.  I hope to make it a slim hardcover, but no promises yet!

Full details will be released shortly, but buyers of the special bundles will get both books plus some other exclusive goodies.  So well worth getting ready to pounce!

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Our first review of ‘Caledonia Dreamin’ came in last week, Eibonvale’s groundbreaking anthology of dark fiction of Scottish descent exploring some of the wonderful words afforded us by the Scots dialect. That our first reviewer’s first language is not even English, never mind Scots, is just one reason for us to take our hats off to her. Margrét Helgadóttir writes:

“These tales are weird, terrifying, dark, beautiful, disturbing and funny. It was quite a thought-provoking read. Some of these stories are amongst the best stories I have read for quite a while and I recommend the book for not only the lovers of Scotland, the Scots language or linguistics in general, but for all fans of the weird and unexplainable, or people who enjoys plain good writing…

…There is a sincere voice throughout Caledonia Dreamin’, either the characters speak directly to you or whisper to you as if from the corner of a bizarre dream. In hindsight I think that this is the main reason why I spent such a long time reading this book. It’s such a challenging voice, difficult to not be moved or troubled by. And I can’t help but wonder if it’s the Scottish language that creates this feeling of the sincere and true voice. The editors have done a fine job creating this flow and expression.”
Read Margrét’s review in full over at the Future Fire review site.

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Pauline Masurel has handed in a rave review of Eibonvale’s railway anthology ‘Rustblind and Silverbight’ over at The Short Review website. Pauline writes:

“There are twenty-four stories in this chunky book, which is billed as A Slipstream Anthology of Railway Stories. Many of the stories take liberties with reality, slipping effortlessly into fantastic worlds, but many of them are also quite strongly rooted in reality. This seems appropriate, given that railways are part of the edgelands, borderline places that divide landscapes. The book isn’t a cyberpunk, geek-fest of futuristic fiction but more of an insidious virus eating away at veracity. If ‘strangeness’ is the primary defining feature of slipstream literature then this collection has it by the carriage-load…

…This book may not be the ideal Christmas gift for a trainspotting old buffer (although it might be just the ticket if he or she has suitably open-minded, eclectic reading tastes). But I think it could induce at least a modest portion of train-appreciation in the most vehement rail-deniers. Reading this anthology I became convinced that every story should have a railway in it somewhere; it’s just that no one has realised this before. Try it out for yourself, but don’t forget to mind the gap…”

Our thanks to Pauline. Please do support her website by reading the review in full.

Cover Reveal: Caledonia Dreamin’

Posted: October 6, 2013 by eibonvale in Caledonia Dreamin', New Titles

Our next book to be released is Caledonia Dreamin’, an anthology based on the glorious and unique words of the Scottish.  Glaikit, mockit, droukit, drouthy, couthy, scunner, thrawn – the Scots language is rich with words too gallus not to glory in, dialect terms that deserve better than to be boxed away as precious oddities. Here we’ve collected some of the strangest writers of Scottish descent to bring these terms to life – that’s Scottish by heritage or residence, adoption or initiation…

And here is the cover!  – hopefully finished aside from any 11th hour polishing and tweaks that arise (they usually do the moment I publish the damn thing!). This is one of Eibonvale’s odder attempts I think – with a full dictionary on the jacket and more text than art. Bit of a mind-fuck really if anyone starts to seriously try and elucidate the illustrations!  Or so i hope!   Anyway, here it is. November 1st is the official release date and I am really hoping to have some copies for WorldCon 2013!

Caledonia Dreamin FINAL

The pre-orders for Brendan Connell’s new novel Miss Homicide Plays the Flute are now open. This is one of the most unusual books Eibonvale has worked on, with multicoloured inks and a hugely eccentric cover (which you will have to wait a little to see i’m afraid!). Perhaps most importantly though, this is our first ever signed and numbered limited edition, printed by Anthony Rowe.

The first 26 copies to be ordered will come with a free and exclusive lettered chapbook entitled Drops of Poison.

Click the link to find out more and to place an order.

http://www.eibonvalepress.co.uk/books/books_homicide.htm

Impending Homicide

Posted: September 4, 2013 by eibonvale in Miss Homicide Plays the Flute, New Titles

Things are rattling on well with the design for Miss Homicide Plays the Flute – the wild and astringent short novel by Brendan Connell that will be our next release. I really need to get the pre-orders open for that soon – at this rate the pre-order period will be quite short!

This will be our first ever limited edition (non-POD) book, so the excitement and tension here at Eibonvale Towers is intense.  Fittingly, it is one of the bizarrest physical the press has ever done. Even aside from the wild text, filled with the author’s trademark bitter experimental classicism and erudite placement, it should feature things like multicolour type and one of the stranger covers yet, leaning much more towards the sparse line-art that i do than the usual collages.

I’ll be keeping you informed and hopefully opening for orders soon. So be ready!

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Cover not final!

Making the selection of works for our anthology of railway stories Rustblind and Silverbright was a challenging process and many interesting stories fell by the wayside.  In the case of this spectacularly dark, lively and brash novella by Poppet, which was just too big for the anthology, we decided to bring it out as a separate book – Moonshine Express.  This will be available individually and alongside Rustblind and Silverbright, making a very good pairing.  This is Poppet’s first appearance in hardcover – or as she put it, “There’s so little ‘virgin’ left in my author world, and David is popping the hardcover cherry! A first! That totally rocks!”  A phrase I will just leave hanging in the air with no further comment.

Click the image to find out more.

Coincidentally, I am hoping that this book will launch a new line of Eibonvale novellas (about which more later). Look forward to pre-ordering the hardcover of BOTH titles starting from 22nd June at 6PM, including some nice special touches provided by Poppet – but I will be formally announcing that in the next post!

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Attention world! The paperback version of Defeated Dogs by Quentin S Crisp has now gone to the printers and is available for order through the Eibonvale website for dispatch in a couple of weeks – later on through Amazon etc. as well. As usual, I hope you will go through the website if at all possible, that way I actually get paid a little! :-) And with launch events and major expeditions looming, I need it! As usual, Postage is free in the UK, USA and Australia. If you are from anywhere else, please email me. Thanks folks!

Rustblind 5Here at last is the first public look at the cover for Rustblind and Silverbright, though it has been on my facebook pages for a few days now.  The book is currently at the printers and I am awaiting the delivery of the proof copy, to tell me if everything is ok.  As you can see, this one is an even more bizarre cover than usual in terms of structure with a massive rear ‘contents map’ on the back that extends right onto the rear flap.

With the launch of this, the first true anthology I have edited, we are planning a big event in London entitled Slipstream Journeys, which will bring several new books by several specialist presses together into one evening of readings and wine.

The books involved will be:

  • Rustblind and Silverbright: Slipstream Stories of the Railway, edited by David Rix
  • Defeated Dogs, by Quentin S Crisp
  • Stardust by Nina Allan
  • Helen’s Story, by Rosanne Rabinowitz
  • Jane, by P.F. Jeffery

The event will take place at the Review Bookshop, Peckham on the 4th July at 7PM.  I hope you can make it.  There will be wine to drink and authors to meet.  Readings to listen to and books to buy!

Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/535004643230635/

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Talking of trains (and we have been talking of trains rather a lot here recently at the Eibonvale Terminus), or is it buses, what is it they say about three coming along at once?
First up, Charles Packer over at Sci Fi Online, has given Rhys Hughes’ 23rd published book (wow!) ‘Tallest Stories’ a rather respectable 8/10. Charles writes:

“…Normal literary conventional barriers are broken and both the author and the audience, at times, become active participants. With its stories within stories, it’s akin to a juxtaposition of Monty Python and Kafka where the stories can coexist as horribly absurd and absurdly horrible.

As you get into the book the stories become self-referential, slowly building up a complete picture of the tavern and its patrons. Hughes intends to complete a cycle of one thousand stories which are all interconnected and not just in a linear form, as such Tallest Stories acts as a taster for the eventual wider work. Each tale is headed with a drawing by David Rix, who also created the book’s cover…

…It’s a clever book written with wit and a good eye for a humorous turn of phrase. Read carefully, there is a lot of philosophical meat to the overall book, although if this is not your bag the stories can be read for the giggles alone.”

Next “Gav” at Mass Movement Magazine has reviewed ‘Tallest Stories’, saying among other things:

“…A little tavern in Cardiff docks where the currency is a good story and all of the patrons seem to have a brilliant tale to tell forms the basis for ‘Tallest Stories’ and all of the brilliant tales are present and correct in this collection penned by Rhys Hughes. Every separate tale is a great stand-alone piece, each one incedibly inventive and different from the last, but at the same time, each story seems to sit perfectly well alongside all the others in the collection. Hughes’ writing is easy to follow and enjoyable…”

Last but not least, the legendary D.F Lewis has done one of his mind-boggling real-time reviews of the book, which are always a challenge for chaps like me to paraphrase, but here goes:

“…the multifarious pieces of internal (and cover) art by David Rix are wonderful and give the whole book a definite character. Based on my nostalgic, old-fashioned experience of secondhand bookshops, I can imagine one where somebody much younger than me pounces on this hard copy book as the optimum book to be found in any secondhand bookshop ever – surely because of its durable soul as a book. I can give its overall production no greater praise…

…Rhys Hughes’ work often reawakens my own waking dreams when, as a child, being put to bed too early, I imagined all sorts of weird and wonderful reality-steeped fabrications. Hughes has uniquely taken this ability into an adulthood creativity – for the benefit of resummoning this nostalgic activity for fellowkind and, accepting that, we should all be grateful.

…I think I have already shown the prevailing factors that make this a seriously great book, possibly Rhys Hughes’ greatest book so far. And the production qualities, story-heading images, designs etc by Eibonvale Press and David Rix do it proud.”

Hearty thanks as ever to all these reviewers. Please check out their respective websites in full.