Posts Tagged ‘hal duncan’

cover_testament_fullTwo new Eibonvale titles are now available for order – and two very exciting ones.  The first is a substantial new novel by Hal Duncan (author of Vellum and Ink) – Testament.

In the 21st century, a scalpel slices bible pages, passages spliced to restore lost truth. In the days of King Herod, the messias rises, calling to black sheep: walk with me. Now, here, between two aeons and across Æternity, a beloved student rebuilds his Gospel for the era of Anonymous: anarchist, socialist, atheist, revolutionary. Forget the tale you were spun and open your ears to the teacher who said, I will have mercy and not sacrifice. From the Hebridean fishing village of Capernaum, to a Jerusalem under Il Duce Pontius Pilate…

The Empire ends today.

cover_scarcity_fullThe second new title is Scar City, a new collection by Joel Lane.  This book was submitted to Eibonvale shortly before the author’s death and I am very excited indeed to release it now.  It contains 22 stories and an essay by Nina Allan on the author’s Blue trilogy of novels.

Both of these are available to order now in hardcover, with paperbacks to follow.  If anyone is interested in review copies, don’t hesitate to get in touch with details.

cover_caledonia_full
Our first review of ‘Caledonia Dreamin’ came in last week, Eibonvale’s groundbreaking anthology of dark fiction of Scottish descent exploring some of the wonderful words afforded us by the Scots dialect. That our first reviewer’s first language is not even English, never mind Scots, is just one reason for us to take our hats off to her. Margrét Helgadóttir writes:

“These tales are weird, terrifying, dark, beautiful, disturbing and funny. It was quite a thought-provoking read. Some of these stories are amongst the best stories I have read for quite a while and I recommend the book for not only the lovers of Scotland, the Scots language or linguistics in general, but for all fans of the weird and unexplainable, or people who enjoys plain good writing…

…There is a sincere voice throughout Caledonia Dreamin’, either the characters speak directly to you or whisper to you as if from the corner of a bizarre dream. In hindsight I think that this is the main reason why I spent such a long time reading this book. It’s such a challenging voice, difficult to not be moved or troubled by. And I can’t help but wonder if it’s the Scottish language that creates this feeling of the sincere and true voice. The editors have done a fine job creating this flow and expression.”
Read Margrét’s review in full over at the Future Fire review site.