Posts Tagged ‘Reviews’

cover_defeated_fullA great new review of Quentin S Crisp’s collection Defeated Dogs.

http://www.britishfantasysociety.org/reviews/defeated-dogs-by-quentin-s-crisp-book-review/

“Quentin S. Crisp delights, informs, disturbs and confuses in equal measure. Really, what more could a discerning reader ask for?”

Thanks to Craig Lockley for this one!

Solar Bridge reviews Unpleasant Tales

Posted: October 9, 2010 by brendanconnell in Reviews
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The review is here, and says in part:

“As it is, the writing in these stories is such that, rather than simply being shocking, or gory, there is a real sense depth to the characters and the situations. Though, often, you may be unnerved by the behaviour of one or another of the characters – and much of it is shocking –  it is believable and consistent with what you have already read. Whilst many of these stories are visceral, nothing that transpires feels arbitrary or cheap.”

Blogcritics on Unpleasant Tales

Posted: October 7, 2010 by brendanconnell in Reviews
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Gordon Hauptfleisch at Blogcritics gives a very positive, in-depth review of Unpleasant Tales.

Unpleasant Tales Reviews

Posted: August 13, 2010 by brendanconnell in Reviews
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A couple of reviews of Unpleasant Tales have come in.

Seregil of Rhiminee gives a very positive review at Risingshadow.net, from which I have extracted the following quote:

“What I like most about Brendan Connell is that he’s able to write about different kind of obsessions, perversities and weird happenings without flinching (he doesn’t shy away from difficult subjects). He doesn’t stop where other writers would stop, but goes full speed ahead and doesn’t look back. He’s also able to turn a perfectly normal story to a visceral story with just a few sentences and words.”

And, over at the Theaker’s Quarterly blog, Stephen Theaker likes the book and says:

“On the whole, these stories live up to the book’s title extremely well. “For an artist, all experiences are exquisite”, claims the protagonist of “The Tongue”, and this collection pushes that idea to its limit.”